Win a copy of “The Good Lie,” Starring Reese Witherspoon

It is that special time of year when there are contests galore, and here is a very special one. simply share this blog post with your favourite social media outlet and drop me a comment to let me now you have, and you will be entered to win a DVD copy of “The Good Lie.” A winner will be chosen on the 23rd of December!

This film has gotten absolutely fantastic reviews and is definitely worth taking the time to see.

Find out more about the movie below. Happy holidays everyone!

1000439308BRDLEFO_f2fef56 THE GOOD LIE THE GOOD LIE

Click on the press release below to enlarge.

thegoodliepic

Revelation! From the Treetops

ionia martin:

A revelation indeed! Be careful in those trees, Jules.

Originally posted on Julian Froment's Blog:

The ‘double top secret’ project from my post of a few days ago, ‘Holy Crap!’, is now completed and can be revealed. So without further ado, except for the obligatory drum roll, here it is.

A Poetic ProposalIt is available here:

Amazon US

Amazon UK

I have been working on a small collection of poems, a humble effort that I have now published on amazon. Most of you that have been following this blog for a while will not be surprised to know that the entire collection is dedicated to the love of my life, Ionia, the inspiration in all I do. This includes a personal message for her, and this book is my version of shouting my love for her from the treetops. The poems are all based on love and separation, as you could have no doubt guessed.

I would also like to have a blog tour (some…

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Lolita in the Lion’s Den by Justin Forest

Lolita in the Lion's Den or Pre-Tween JuxtapositionLolita in the Lion’s Den or Pre-Tween Juxtaposition by Justin Forest

A troubled young man must find a way to navigate his hypersexualized world in Justin Forest’s riveting new novel, Lolita in the Lion’s Den or Pre-Tween Juxtaposition.

Glen has always been an outcast. Born into an emotionally abusive household, where his mother relies on him as her only confidante and his father is a child molester, his sense of self-hatred only fuels the isolation he experiences both at home and at school.

Finding relief from the harsh realities of the world through increasingly vivid fantasies, Glen has finally had enough.

Quitting school and fleeing home, he drifts from one aimless job to the next as he wrestles with this attraction to both women and girls.

Fearing he will one day become like his father, Glen must come to terms with the person he truly is in order to learn how to become the person he wants to be.

My rating: 3 of 5 stars

3.5 stars.

I like books that make other people squirm. I’m still trying to find one that can make me uncomfortable.

So, since I am the odd variety of reader that reads a little bit of everything, I found this interesting. I did a review on a book called “Perv” earlier in the year that I found rather fascinating and this book even mentioned that book, so automatically I wanted to read more.

When you first get into this book, you really aren’t sure if you are reading fiction or part-fiction or non-fiction. It is a strange sort of book that will make some people angry early on and turn them off from finishing it through brutally honest language and the sort of realism that many do not wish to face. Others, myself included, will find it daring and bold and congratulate the author for not holding back. I don’t have to agree with the author to find value in a book, and this book, fiction or otherwise is all about reality.

This is not the kind of book that I would recommend to everyone I know. It isn’t an enjoyable afternoon read or a fun romp into the imagination of a creative author. It is a disturbing, at times difficult to read book with an important message–anything can happen at any time and the experiences of childhood can create lingering issues in adulthood.

Overall, this was interesting and I was glad I read it. If you are looking for something different, and you can handle a bit of harshness, then this would be a good choice.

This review is based on a complimentary copy in exchange for an honest review. All opinions are my own.

View all my reviews

Calling all Children’s Authors

ionia martin:

Children’s authors! You are wanted!

Originally posted on Year 'Round Thanksgiving Project:

I have a project in mind for our Early Childhood Initiative we are involved with at work. But I need your help.

I want to do YouTube videos of me reading books for young children. But the copyright laws are funny things and don’t permit me to do that unless they are public domain or I seek out and get permission from each author. The purpose of this project is to add the videos to our website (which is still under construction, but will be childrenreadytolearn.com). We are interested in promoting reading and reading with your own children. But sometimes parents need a little help. Plus, we have a reading mascot (Blossom the Book Butterfly) whose costume I would be wearing in the video.

By allowing me permission to use your book to read to children through video, your book would be promoted with a link – and if it…

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Book Tour: Gideon Lee by Lisa Orchard

GideonLee 500x750Blurb:  Seventeen-year-old Lark Singer only has two things going for her, her music and her best friend Bean. While entering a competition she hopes will launch their music career, Lark searches for answers that will make her whole. Her quest reveals some secrets that those around her would rather keep hidden. As the competition looms closer, Lark discovers not only who she really is, but also who her real friends are. Then tragedy threatens everything she has worked so hard to accomplish. Can she pick up the pieces and move on?

Excerpt:

Chapter One

I want to be like Gideon Lee. My lips move as I read the title of my essay. They twitch as I stifle a snicker. Looking around the room, I make sure no one has seen my facial tic. My eyes light upon the Presidents’ pictures lined up on the wall. They face me, each with a unique expression, and I wonder what they were thinking while they posed. They are above the clock so my gaze naturally falls on it. It’s almost time for lunch.

I settle back in my seat and my lips twitch again. A feeling of defiant exhilaration washes over me like a tidal wave.

Montgomery’s going to freak when he reads this.

Despite my best efforts, a giggle escapes and the boy in front of me turns around and gives me the evil eye. I return the glare. He is slumped over, and sweat beads on his upper lip. I think this is odd — it’s rather chilly in the room — but dismiss it before I turn back to my essay.

I bet old man Montgomery doesn’t even know who Gideon Lee is. This thought sends another giggle to the surface, but I quickly squash it by biting my lip.

I picture him searching Gideon Lee’s name on the Internet. I see his expression changing from confusion to disgust. I imagine him taking off his black, thick-rimmed glasses and shaking his head. I hear him mutter, “Lark Singer, what are you doing?” He rubs his face. I can actually hear the rough sandpapery sound as his hand finds his day old stubble. He sighs and puts his glasses back on. “What am I going to do with you?”

I remember when Mr. Montgomery first told us about the assignment. We were supposed to write an essay on someone we admire, someone who has contributed to society in some way. I know when he says this he wants us to write about an a historical figure. After all this is history class, but I raised my hand anyway.

“Lark,” he called out as he stood at his lectern.

“Do they have to be dead?”

He cocked his head as he studied me with his piercing blue eyes. Then he ran his hand over his military style crew cut, and I watched as his salt and pepper hair flattened then popped back into place as if each hair was standing at attention. I could tell he wasn’t sure where this was going. “Well… I guess not.” That’s when he froze, as if he realized he had just opened a door for me and he wasn’t going to like what was on the other side. He shifted his weight, and looked down at the floor before he backpedaled. “But they have to have made a positive contribution to society. It can’t be about a mobster or anything like that.” Pursing his lips, he stared at me, fiddling with those glasses. “This is one half of your semester grade, Lark. I wouldn’t pull any funny stuff.”

“Oh, I won’t. Scout’s honor,” I answered sweetly, placing my hand over my heart and giving him the scout salute, while inside I planned my rebellion.

I have him. I’m going to write about Gideon Lee, and there’s nothing he can do about it.

 20111210_ABS_1296[1]Author Bio: 

Lisa Orchard grew up loving books. Hooked on mysteries by the fifth grade, she even wrote a few of her own. She knew she wanted to be a writer even then. Her first series, The Super Spies,” has reached bestseller status

  After graduating from Central Michigan University with a Marketing Degree, she spent many years in the insurance industry, pining to express her creative side. The decision to stay home with her children gave her the opportunity to follow her dream and become a writer. She currently resides in Rockford Michigan with her husband, Steve, and two wonderful boys. Currently, shes working on a Coming of Age Young Adult series called The Starlight Chronicles. When shes not writing she enjoys spending time with her family, running, hiking, and reading.

Guest Review: Abe Lincoln Public Enemy No. 1

My lovely friend and fellow book lover Pamela

has agreed to share her thoughts on “Abe Lincoln: Public Enemy No. 1.  It’s a great review from a trusted reader. Check out the review and check out the book. Looks like fun!

 

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WATCH THE TRAILER: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WiiiOh…

When John Wilkes Booth shoots Lincoln with a bullet cursed by the notorious Chicken Man, a local voodoo practitioner, he unwittingly sets in motion a chain of events extending far into the future. Instead of killing Lincoln, the bullet puts the president into a coma for sixty-eight years, his body remaining limber and ageless. When he awakens in 1933, Abe Lincoln is a man out of time, a revered icon…and a political pariah. FDR and J. Edgar Hoover not only do not want him around, they want him to retire. But their plan to be rid of him backfires and Lincoln is on the run, a fugitive from justice.

Determined to reach Chicago and retrieve the small fortune left in trust for him by his long-dead son, Lincoln discovers that Hoover has confiscated all his money, leaving him destitute. With Bureau of Investigation agent Melvin Purvis in hot pursuit, Lincoln finds his way to a hobo camp where he befriends a young runaway, who agrees to accompany the former president back to Washington. There Lincoln hopes that Hannah Wheelhouse, the Chicken Man’s granddaughter, can help him find the peace he longs for.

Then fate deals Lincoln another strange hand when he and the boy end up as hostages to infamous bank robber John Dillinger. Instead of leaving them by the side of the road after the robbery, Dillinger takes a liking to Lincoln and invites him to join the gang, promising him he’ll get all his money back.

Will Lincoln survive long enough to recapture his fortune and get away, or will he be hunted down in a manner unbefitting a martyred President?

In Brian Anthony and Bill Walker’s inventive and entertaining novel, history gets a work-out, the action is flat-out, and almost everyone gets rubbed-out!

–From Goodreads

 

Pamela’s Review:

 

It’s a bit risky to take historical figures and events and create a new reality, but factor in that the historical figure is a beloved and highly respected one and you have the recipe for a potential disaster. In this case though, the disaster was averted with good writing and a compelling story.

I’m a fan of all things Lincoln so I was curious how this story would play out. The book started out with the facts of Lincoln’s assassination, embellished with a bit of voodoo magic. In a nutshell, Lincoln ends up in a coma instead of dead. Rather than tell the American people the truth, he is allowed to live asleep…for 70 years, without aging.

Once Lincoln wakes up, his adventures begin. FDR was President and J. Edgar Hoover was in charge of damage control. Honest Abe meets a boy and they begin a life on the road trying to avoid being hunted down by Hoover and his men. There were a couple of places where the story seemed to skip some crucial information.

The paranormal aspect of this book requires the reader to suspend reality. While I was able to look past many things, it still felt like a story. When I read Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter I was able to actually believe this is what could have happened. With Public Enemy, there was never any doubt this was just a story.

There were passages where Lincoln would say and do things that were in keeping with his historical self. Then there were others where it was too far fetched to be Lincoln as we know him.

I wasn’t happy with the ending of the book. Not like it didn’t end the way I wanted it to end, but it just felt incomplete. It was almost like the authors ran out of steam and gave up.

The book was entertaining and well written, however. I would recommend it for anyone who enjoys a little history sprinkled into their reading. The best line in the book was when Abe was told he should shave his beard so he wouldn’t be as recognizable, “You can’t go around lookin’ like a penny, Mr. Lincoln.” Four out of five stars.

The Carpathian Assignment by Chip Wagar

The Carpathian Assignment: The True History of the Apprehension and Death of Dracula Vlad Tepes, Count and Voivode of the Principality of TransylThe Carpathian Assignment: The True History of the Apprehension and Death of Dracula Vlad Tepes, Count and Voivode of the Principality of Transyl by Chip Wagar

Kalvary Istvan, widower and former Hungarian cavalry colonel, hopes for a quiet life when he accepts the position of chief of police in the Carpathian city of Bistritz. It’s no less than a man deserves after years of service to his Kaiser and king. Sadly, Istvan’s going to be disappointed. Someone or something haunts the streets of Bistritz and the surrounding Transylvanian mountains. Ask Istvan’s new colleague, Gabor Kasza of the Royal Hungarian Gendarmerie, and he’d say evidence points to a well-established serial killer, possibly hidden among the oppressed and reviled Roma, who call the nearby Borgo Pass home. Ask Freudian devotee Baron Krafft-Ebing and he’d agree, although his interest lies more in studying the psychopath’s mind than bringing him to justice. Ask the mountain people of the Carpathians, however, and they’d disagree. They’d point to the long history of killings and disappearances in the region, which stretch back longer than any one man’s lifetime. They’d speak in hushed voices of the Roma’s supposed master, and an abandoned castle where he lives with his demonic wives. The bravest residents might even risk whispering a name: Dracula. Kalvary Istvan, like Kasza and Krafft-Ebing, considers himself a modern nineteenth-century man, with little time for legends and superstitions, but as he and Kasza pursue their investigation, reason and deduction begin to give way to dark, ancient truths and local belief. At once a thrilling detective yarn and intriguing backstory to Bram Stoker’s Dracula, The Carpathian Assignment immerses readers in the rich setting of the Hungarian kingdom at the end of the nineteenth century, a nation in which science and logic clash with centuries of cultural conviction and superstition.

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

So…this is possibly the best sort-of-Dracula-like-book I have ever read. It is also possibly the worst ARC copy that I have ever bloody seen. Through no fault of the author, there are large chunks of text missing and most of the beginnings of each paragraph. The Final copy, of course will not look like this, so it is of no real concern to the final book readers, but I would have felt bad if I didn’t mention that there were parts of the book I did not get to read.

As far as the story goes, this is very well written and has the historical backing that most books of the sort completely lack. It is obvious that Chip Wagar is familiar with the geography of the places he writes about as well as the historical matter. This was a nice change from many books that simply have Dracula featured as a bloodthirsty vampire.

This story progressed nicely and at a good clip, with lots of mysteries to be solved and a villain that did not simply skulk off into hiding or get defeated at the drop of a….wooden stake. I liked that the historical angle was used to back up the story and flesh it out.

The only thing that irked me about this novel, were the sex scenes. It wasn’t that they were poorly written, but they seemed misplaced, as though they were an afterthought. People have been dying for years due to this monster, we should have sex! Really, it just didn’t work for me.

An entertaining romp into the remote Carpathian wilds, exciting for a girl from Romania. If you are interested in the historical Dracula, then you will likely enjoy this novel.

This review is based on a complimentary copy from the publisher and provided through Netgalley. All opinions are my own.