The Great American Slow Cooker Book: 500 Easy Recipes for Every Day and Every Size Machine

The Great American Slow Cooker Book: 500 Easy Recipes for Every Day and Every Size MachineThe Great American Slow Cooker Book: 500 Easy Recipes for Every Day and Every Size Machine by Bruce Weinstein

The ultimate in slow-cooker books–with 500 recipes, each adapted for three sizes of appliance. From breakfast to soups, mains to grains, vegetables to desserts, this guide is the only book you’ll ever need to master your slow cooker or crockpot.

Millions of people are turning to slow cookers for their weeknight meals yet often can’t find recipes that match their exact machine. Adapting recipes meant for a different-size cooker doesn’t work–getting the right level of spice in your Vietnamese soup or keeping pulled pork tender requires having ingredients in the right proportion. But now, Bruce Weinstein and Mark Scarbrough have decoded slow cookers, and each of their recipes includes ingredient proportions for 2-3 quart, 4-5 quart, and 6-8 quart machines, guaranteeing a perfect fit no matter what machine you own. Each recipe is labeled for its level of difficulty and nutritional value, and they cover every kind of dish imaginable: delicious breakfast oatmeals, slow-braised meats, succulent vegetables, sweet jams and savory sauces, decadent desserts. This is the slow cooker book to end them all.

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

This book is really good for the cook who doesn’t have a tremendous amount of time to prepare meals big enough for an entire family. I liked that there were measurements for various sized slow cookers, so you don’t have to guess how much of something you will need to make an adjustment.

There are a lot of recipes in this book (500 to be exact) and many of them do not require special ingredients that most people won’t have on hand. The recipes are not time consuming and are easy enough that even the kids can help.

There are recipes here for every meal and even for drinks and desserts, so it will cover all the basics. The recipes can be easily adjusted to suit your personal tastes and become family favourites.

I enjoyed the way this book is set up, with variations on basic recipes. There are a lot of things I never would have thought of doing with a slow cooker that I discovered in these pages.

This would make a nice gift or just a good go-to book for anyone’s kitchen.

Recommended.

Mirror Interview # 5 Luccia Gray

*Today our guest is the lovely and talented Luccia Gray. Please welcome her and take a moment to say hello and check out her work! If you would like to do your own mirror interview–it’s a lot of fun talking to yourself–go to the contact me page and send me an email :) CIMG4315

Why do you use a pen name?

There is a long literary tradition of writers using pen names. 19th century authors were keen users; Currer, Acton and Ellis Bell (the Brontes), George Elliot, (Mary Anne Evans), George Sand, Lewis Carroll, Mark Twain. There are many contemporary examples, too: Anne Perry, Anne Rice, and Toni Morrison, among others. No doubt their reasons are/were varied. There is no one reason why a writer decides to write with a pen name.

I started using a pen name because I wanted my ‘writing persona’ to be distinct to my ‘ordinary persona’. I don’t consider it a pseudonym because I don’t keep it a secret. I consider it my ‘artistic name’. I’m trying to keep both ‘personas’ apart professionally, although they sometimes overlap.

Why Luccia Gray?

My pen name is part of me, so it’s an anagram of my birth name: Lucy Garcia. I changed the letters around to produce Luccia Gray. I feel comfortable using it. I consider it a tribute to myself, because I’m finally accomplishing my life-long dream to publish my work and become an author.

How does Lucy feel about Luccia?

Luccia is very special and fragile. She’s insecure, sensitive, and very creative. Lucy is assertive, strong-minded, and very practical. Lucy is very proud of Luccia, and Luccia is glad Lucy found the time, and peace of mind, to give birth to her. I know it sounds weird, but we both feel very pleased with this arrangement!

Why should I read your novel?

All Hallows at Eyre Hall, is a great read. It’s an intriguing and exciting neo Victorian, gothic novel, set in an imposing mansion, frequented by villains, heroes, lovers, and ghosts. I challenge you to read chapter one, and you won’t be able to put it down!

Which are your favourite lines in the novel?

All Hallows is a powerful novel. The characters who breathe life into the narrative are all unique and impressive, that is why so many have been given a voice and a point of view.

There are some beautiful and intriguing letters in the novel. The following extract is from a letter written by one of my favourite characters:

‘My hand trembles as I write this letter. I humbly entreat you to consider it a token of my eternal loyalty and adoration. I can no longer wait in silence while I watch you suffer unjustly. You are not alone. The place I most cherish is by your side, or better still, in your shadow. I offer myself to you in humble and loyal service for the rest of my days. For you alone, I live, I hope, and pray. I will do anything to alleviate your distress and contribute to your contentment. You alone shall be my mistress. My only wish is to remain as close to you as I should be allowed.’

What are you working on now?

I published All Hallows at Eyre Hall as an ebook in May, and it will also be available in print, soon. It is book one of The Eyre Hall Trilogy. I’m currently writing book two, Twelfth Night at Eyre Hall, which should be out at Christmas 2014. Book three, Midsummer at Eyre Hall, is due next summer, 2015.

Why did you decide to self-publish?

It seemed to be a daunting task to find an agent and/or a publisher, and I didn’t want to wait around for replies to query letters, so I just got on with it! I wrote my first novel, found wonderful beta readers, to test my novel and get quality feedback, a proof-reader, and a cover artist. I finally formatted for Amazon and CreateSpace on my own. Now I’m busy writing and promoting my book, myself.

Quite honestly, it has been a fascinating journey, and I’ve met so many wonderful people along the way, in the last eight months, that I’m really glad I decided to do it by myself. On the other hand, I would be delighted to find an agent and a publisher, to help me with practical matters, so that I could get on with my writing…

More Information and to contact Luccia Gray:

Visit Luccia Gray’s Blog at http://www.lucciagray.com

Read the first chapter of All Hallows at Eyre Hall: http://www.amazon.com/All-Hallows-Eyre-Hall-Breathtaking-ebook/dp/B00K2G4SXW/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1405987048&sr=8-1&keywords=luccia+gray#reader_B00K2G4SXW

If you are interested in reviewing this novel, please contact me at luccia.gray@gmail.com

Follow Luccia on Twitter: @LucciaGray

Visit Luccia on Goodreads: http://www.goodreads.com/author/show/8186541.Luccia_Gray

Like Luccia’s Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/LucciaGray?ref=hl

Salvation by W.A. Heisler

SalvationSalvation by W.A. Heisler

Salvation is a fast-paced book of horror garunteed to raise the hairs on the back of the neck. It’s style has been compared to the works of Stephen King and Dean Koontz. Salvation begins with a frantic phone call to Father Brian Halloway from Eric Parkins, a parishioner in his church, who is desperate to find answers to his wife’s strange behavior following the death of her mother. It seems to Halloway that the woman is simply having difficulty coping with her grief, and nothing seems out of the ordinary. Until he is told about the “thing” in the basement. And how Sylvia changes after nightfall. It is then, the priest begins to worry. After witnessing Sylvia’s disturbing and violent behavior for himself, Halloway comes to the conclusion that something has gone horribly wrong at 1312 Lafayette Drive. Fearing for the safety of the couple, Halloway enlists the help of his longtime friend and fellow priest Father Michael Constantine, a priest chosen to fight the deadliest of wars, and the keeper of New York Dioceses’ darkest secret. It is then the dark war begins. Constantine, joined by Father James Connelly, a young priest eager to prove himself to his mentor, along with Halloway, Sylvia’s husband, and her brother, Mark Barnett, a doctor who is hiding his own dangerous secret set out to engage the invading entity. The men quickly come face to face with a savage, brutal being that snakes its way into the darkest depths of their psyches in its unyielding and vicious attempts to destroy them and all who participate in its “game.” The book climaxes with the entrance of Arandavius, a dark, tragic figure, fallen with Lucifer after The Great War. A fallen angel who walks the earth and claims hismission is to send the demon back to its “Realm.” A being Constantine knows has held one title since his expulsion. Arandavius: The Overlord of Legion. Constantine finds himself trying to save a woman who is now caught in the middle of a vicious game of cat-and-mouse between two demons-one, a brutal, sadistic being who holds the life and soul of its victim in its clutches-the other, the most savage and merciless of Legion’s warriors. A game both beings are willing to play out to its explosive and bloody end. Welcome to darkness. Welcome.to the game.

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

I really liked this book!

The horror genre can go either way for me. Sometimes I really like the idea, but the execution seems off, or the book is too bloody and gory. It is hard to find a horror novel that keeps up an intense pace without coming off as silly or losing speed as it goes along. This book never slows down and is interesting right to the very end.

If you have ever read a book and wished that you could keep one of the characters as a friend or ally once the book is finished, then you will know what I mean when I say that I was sorry to see fallen angel Arandavius go. He was the type of character that you can’t help but love. He should get his own series.

The author did a fantastic job of coming up with an original idea about what happens with fallen angels and creating a scenario that made me stop and think. I was very impressed with the possession scenes as they stayed consistent throughout the story and didn’t waver. I didn’t want to go to sleep with the light off.

This book takes what happened in the exorcist and makes it look like a mild case of PMS. I appreciated that the author was able to make this possession not only span the entire book, but involve multiple characters. I was pleasantly surprised by the way the story unfolded. I expected most of the cast to be wiped out before the end of the book, and that did not happen. I love it when you can’t predict an ending.

The only thing that left me a little disappointed in this novel was that Eric and Sylvia didn’t get more of the stage for their last act. For a story that was built surrounding them from the beginning, I thought thy should have been followed up a bit more before the close of the book.

This is an excellent book, and even for those who aren’t a particular fan of horror, I think this could still be appealing.

Recommended.

This review is based on a complimentary copy from the publisher and provided through Netgalley. All opinions are my own.

The Art Restorer by Julian Sanchez

The Art RestorerThe Art Restorer by Julián Sánchez

Enrique Alonso travels from his new home in Manhattan to San Sebastián, Spain, to attend the reopening of the San Telmo museum, where his ex-wife, Bety, works in public relations. There he meets American Craig Bruckner, a retired art restorer studying the museum’s collection of works by Sert—a contemporary of Picasso and Dalí who worked for the most famous billionaires of his time and whose mural American Progress graces the walls of Rockefeller Center. When Bruckner is found drowned in La Concha bay, Bety suspects foul play and Enrique agrees to help her look into the man’s death. Their investigation reveals a mystery connected with Sert’s checkered past, which provides fertile ground for the new thriller Enrique is writing, and the plot develops in parallel to his research.

Enrique and Bety’s reconstruction of the artist’s clandestine activities during World War II leads them to Paris, Barcelona, and New York, and in the process forces them to face their own past. But they are not the only ones interested in Sert’s work, and it appears there is more to his paintings than meets the eye.

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

“The Art Restorer” Is a very relaxing, well written book with a lot of careful mystery.

This is my first work by Julian Sanchez, as I did not read the first book in this series. I don’t think that it is necessary to do so in order to understand this book. There are frequent references to things that happened previously, and I felt like I had enough of an overall picture of the main character’s life to navigate this book just fine.

Whilst I greatly enjoyed this book, there are a few strange passages, where the sentence construction seems off, but that is likely due to translation. For the most part I found this to be a well-paced, interesting journey.

The setting is beautifully described and from the very beginning, the idea that the main character is such a real, down to earth type of person permeates the story. I felt close to him from the beginning, and as a result felt close to the characters he cared about.

Knowing that he is battling his own inner demons and trying to make decisions about his life was a good aside to the rest of the story he is a complex character with a big heart and a conscience that wills him to do the right thing in all situations. Most of the events that happened were believable and there is quite a lot of excitement after the first third of the story, where most of the setup happens.

I was very impressed with this book. If you are a fan of art history, captivating backdrops and imaginative writing, I am certain you will enjoy this novel.

This review is based on a complimentary copy from the publisher and provided through Netgalley. All opinions are my own.

Spooky Word Scrambles by Carolyn Kivett and Chris McMullen

Spooky Word ScramblesSpooky Word Scrambles by Carolyn Kivett and Chris McMullen

These word scramble puzzles consist of spooky words or phrases where the letters have been scrambled. Many of the puzzles relate to Halloween in some way. Solve each puzzle by rearranging the letters to form the word or phrase. For example, rearranging the letters M O B I Z E, we can form the word Z O M B I E. Each puzzle consists of a group of related words or phrases, such as words that relate to ghosts or different kinds of Halloween costumes. Knowing that the words in each puzzle are related may help you unscramble any words or phrases that you don’t see right away. A hints section at the back of the book provides the first letter of each answer, which is handy if you just need a little help; a separate section provides the answers so that you can check your solutions.EXAMPLES P A C EG S A F ND O B O LK A T E SN O C T UT A Y B TM A P R E V IA L C A R D UANSWERS cape, fangs, blood, stake, count, batty, vampire, Dracula.
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Confession: I am such a kid. Really, I had as much fun with this book as the kids I work with did. There are a lot of benefits for children in exploring word scrambles. Elementary children will no doubt find these puzzles fun and challenging, and it is a great way to reinforce proper spelling. For ESL kids, word scrambles are a fun and easy way to help them rearrange letters and learn new words, plus the act of writing them down helps with memory retention.

I was particularly happy with the way this book was arranged, not only because of the fun Halloween theme, but because there is a challenging word at the bottom of each page that is the theme for that set of puzzles. The kids loved it and kept asking to do more puzzles. For a teacher, especially with a large group of kids, this was gold.

Don’t worry parents and teachers, if you don’t have time to figure out if the student was right about each answer, there is a key in the back for us big people.

This is definitely a book that I see helping kids to learn and retain correct spelling. An excellent choice and whole lot of fun. Recommended.

*If you haven’t run into Chris McMullen during your travels around WordPress yet, please do so here

Chris McMullen’s slightly more awesome and much less lewd blog than mine:   chrismcmullen.com

Aside from writing fine educational books, he also writes very helpful articles for authors about marketing, design and other writing essentials. Plus, he is really good at physics so you can ask him annoying questions about the human mind, naturalism, the philosophy of science, Steven Hawking, or Higgs Boson and he will surely blame me. Either way he’s a great guy with a lot of valuable info on his site. Go then. Why you wasting your time here? gooooo……

And this post would not be complete without:

*@$%

The Language of Silence

The Language of SilenceThe Language of Silence by Anna Michaels

My rating: 3 of 5 stars

3.5 stars

This is at once a difficult book to read and an easily flowing tale that will captivate your senses and make your heart bleed for the main character.

The difficulty is not found in the writing style. The author has crafted a beautiful book full of memorable characters that capture your heart and make you really feel for them and their various plights. The main character is a strong female protagonist but does not come off as a staunch feminist. She has a layered personality including a light and silly side that makes you love her.

The difficulty comes in the subject matter. If you have read other books about abused women, such as Black and Blue by Anna Quindlen, then you know how traumatic reading such novels can be. This book is at times heart-wrenching, but beautiful just the same. Any woman who has been in an abusive relationship will no doubt find something to identify with here.

Family and friendships and unlikely bonds take centre stage in this novel and remind us that not all family has to be blood relation. The history of the circus and the demons it possesses makes for an interesting and fulfilling side story that I thought worked really well.

Where I felt this book went awry, was the ending. This was such a serious book throughout, and I expected a big finish where the bad guy got his in the end. I never felt that happened. His goodbye was perhaps creative, and most definitely original, but not altogether believable. In fact, I thought it bordered on silliness. I was left with questions about the safety of the main character and her child.

Still this was a book worthy of the time to read and I will always be happy I had the chance to do so. It is very special to me, for many reasons. I would encourage others to give it a read and form their own opinions about it.

This is the kind of book you want to share with someone you love. Life, second chances, courage and the bravery we don’t always believe we possess until we have to face a situation that draws it out of us are all prevalent themes in this book.

This review is based on a complimentary copy from the publisher and provided through Netgalley. All opinions are my own.

Serious as a heart attack, or two even.

*I hate whine posts, so I’m going to try to avoid that.*

Very early Thursday morning I woke at about 2:30 a.m. in a cold sweat. I felt like someone had punched me in the chest. My first thought was indigestion, so I sat up for a moment looking around until I was more fully awake. I went to take some antacids and realised that I was dizzy. I went back to bed instead. I drifted back to sleep and woke again about 10 minutes later with tachycardia. Once more, I tried to go back to sleep. The third time I woke up, I couldn’t go back to sleep again. It felt like someone was sitting on my chest, and the pain then branched out and radiated into my jaw, my right arm and down my neck and into my lower back. The breaths were short and painful.

This is when I thought–I could be having a heart attack. I immediately followed that thought with another thought. I’m only 32. There’s no way this is a heart attack. The symptoms continued to get worse over a spread of a few hours. The chest pain and pressure would come and go, the arm pain would come and go. The feeling of lock jaw was then joined by waves of nausea, extreme dizziness and confusion. For a bit there, I didn’t even know where I was. I took four baby aspirin and tried again to go to sleep, thinking that I was having some sort of panic attack.

The symptoms went away, for the most part.

I got up around 8 and tried to begin my day. I felt like a limp noodle. No energy, confusion still present, massive headache and sweats and chills. I couldn’t stop coughing and my hands were alternating numbness. My heart was still in weird rhythms. I slept most of the day, waking every now and again with various issues mentioned above. When I got up it was afternoon. I felt tired, but okay.

Then I went to talk to a neighbour. My right arm began to tingle and the uncomfortable sensation spread to my jaw and spine. My heart began beating erratically again. I went down, face first in the drive. Off to the ER.

Without boring you to death with all the minor details, not that this hasn’t been boring enough, I went to the hostpital, got hooked up to every monitoring device know to man, had a series of blood tests done (I’m immune to Vampires.) X-rays of my chest and EEG, EKG, ECG as well as other tests I don’t even have an abbreviation for.

The labs came back during the ECG/EKG. Want to talk about timing? I was already in the midst of the SECOND HEART ATTACK when the labs came back confirming the first. You know–that thing I ignored really early that morning. Turns out a blood clot was responsible for the first one. Since I didn’t call 911 and I didn’t move fast to get help, there is now damage to the left chambers of my heart. And that is my fault.

The second one was more of the same, but I was there and they were able to help me. I will now be on blood thinners to prevent this from happening. I also get a cocktail of downers (Adavan and such) to keep my stress levels and anxiety down. I was diagnosed with pulmonary hypertension, so meds for that too. I will see a specialist next week to decide if the 40 percent damage I did will require surgical intervention.

Now here’s the important part:

Ladies, (Sorry men but you guys have different symptoms.)

I am 32 years old. It happened to me.

If you feel any of these things happening to you and that voice inside your head says “Something isn’t right,” get to the hospital right away. Don’t wait. You aren’t being silly. You aren’t overreacting. Reacting will save your life. It is better to be wrong and be safe, than to not go and suffer worse consequences.

It is not always a “movie heart attack” that will strike you down. I really had very little pain, mostly just discomfort.

One more important thing.

This cardiac room had lots of machines, including Fred, my heart monitor and newest pet. I have to take him on a leash everywhere I go. That wasn’t the important thing though. This room has no telly. That wasn’t either.

Okay really. This made me put everything in perspective. We stress out a lot about little things in our lives that we turn into big crisis. We show anger before we show love and affection. We take for granted the ones who are closest to us and offer us the most support. We are never guaranteed a tomorrow. Never.

Think on that.

If you need me, I’ll be blowing up gloves and making balloon animals.

Love you guys.  Sorry about the typos. My right hand has no strength yet, so typing is taking forever.

A broken kind of beautiful

A Broken Kind of BeautifulA Broken Kind of Beautiful by Katie Ganshert

Fashion is a fickle industry, a frightening fact for twenty-four-year-old model Ivy Clark. Ten years in and she’s learned a sacred truth — appearance is everything. Nobody cares about her broken past as long as she looks beautiful for the camera. This is the only life Ivy knows — so when it starts to unravel, she’ll do anything to hold on. Even if that means moving to the quaint island town of Greenbrier, South Carolina, to be the new face of her stepmother’s bridal wear line — an irony too rich for words, since Ivy is far from the pure bride in white

My rating:

4 of 5 stars

 

A beautiful kind of read.

This book deals with faith very well. There is no surprise or point when this suddenly shifts to a “god book.” Although some Christian novels seem to feel as if they are trying to push or persuade you, this book doesn’t do that. You know from the beginning that it is a Christian book, but the author leaves you free to come to your own conclusions about belief.

In the beginning I wasn’t all that excited about the main character. She came off as a selfish, spoiled brat with an agenda that seemed at first like it would prevent her from forming a real relationship with anyone. I am now certain this was intentional on the part of the author as it allowed for great character growth later in the story.

The relationship between the two main characters is the main focus of this story. There is a lot of tension and I thought the author did an excellent job of making the story line between the two of them both realistic and complicated.

I enjoyed reading this book. It was compelling enough to keep me turning pages and never dulled or hit boring spots. The love story is layered and interesting and the type that you are never quite sure will succeed until the end.

If you enjoy books where the characters feel very real and the issues at hand are things you can relate to, this would be a great choice.

This review is based on a complimentary copy from Waterbrook Multnomah Publishing in exchange for an honest review. All opinions are my own.

Hell yes, I read: Inside the mind of a lifelong reader

This is the conclusion to the 2 part series on reading habits (or not reading, if you caught the first half.) Today we are joined by Pamela, from Year Round Thanksgiving

and Poetry by Pamela.

Pam reads more than anyone else I know, so I thought she would be perfect to provide contrast to our previous guest. She has some really interesting answers, so authors, if you are wondering what makes your book sell, have a read.

 

Ionia: Why do you read so much? There are so many forms of entertainment, but what makes you come back to books?

Pamela: I have always been a reader. I grew up loving books. One of my fondest memories as a very young child, was “running away from home”. My mom had made me do something I didn’t want to do (but I am sure now that it was something I should do) and so I announced that I was going to run away from home. Back then, suitcases were those hard sided ones. I proceeded to pack it full of my books to take with me. No clothes or toys, just books. And then I asked my mom is she would carry it for me so I could run away from home because I could only drag it as far as the end of the driveway.

I’m not really much of a television watcher. I do love movies in the theater, but if the movie is based on a book I’ve read, I’m nearly always disappointed. Books capture my imagination and feed my soul.

Ionia: When you do find a book you think you’d like to read, what is it that first captures your attention? What makes you pick that book rather than another?

Pamela: What better way to spend an afternoon than in a bookstore or library? I can browse for hours. I think that the cover of a book is the first impression. It doesn’t mean that is all I consider, but that is what draws me to look at it. From there, the genre and the book blurb have to captivate me. Of course, most of the indie books are not in the bookstores or libraries and I find those through some of the promotional sites, blogs, and word of mouth.

Ionia: How important are what other customers say about the book in reviews? Do you pay attention to star ratings and customer reviews?

Pamela: Of course I read YOUR reviews and have picked up several books because of that. I don’t generally read reviews of books on the sites where I’m purchasing a book. Reviews can be so skewed by the readers. I rely heavily on the book description. I don’t notice the star ratings as much either.

Ionia: Do you do most of your reading in paper format or digital and why?

Pamela: There was a time I would have answered this question with “I will NEVER read other than a paper book”. Then I bought a Nook. I was hooked from the beginning. I could carry dozens of books with me all the time. About that time I also noticed that I began reading more and more. I was already a voracious reader, but my Nook (Julio is what I named him) was so easy to carry with me everywhere…and I did. But then I realized that so many indie books were only available on the Kindle platform. So I bought a Kindle. They fit so easily into my purse or briefcase so I always have one of them with me. No more outdated boring magazines in waiting rooms. Plus, when I’m reading on my Kindle and fall asleep, it doesn’t (a) hit me in the head and (b) keeps my place. I still love to touch books, smell books, and hold paper books, but I prefer reading electronically.

Ionia: You’ve decided to read this book. What makes you say..never mind. Not for me, or do you ever give up before finishing?

Pamela: I don’t very often quit reading a book. I guess it is that hopeful nature I have that keeps me going. But I do have to say that if a book can’t capture my interest or attention in the first 25-50 pages, there is a strong chance that I may just give up. There are so many really good books to read that I don’t feel it is necessary to read a book that doesn’t hold my attention. There have been some very popular mainstream books that I just couldn’t get through. I’m trying to think of the name…I saw the movie and it was good, but the book just couldn’t keep my interest. Oh, I know, it was “The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo” by Stieg Larrson. Everyone said after the first 100 pages, it got interesting. I just couldn’t wait and gave up. If it is an indie book and has obviously not been proofread or edited, there is also a good chance I will just put it aside too.

Ionia: Does it matter to you if the book was put out by a big publisher or an indie author or indie press? Does the name of the publisher have any influence on if you will take the risk and buy the book?

Pamela: I love indie authors. But I also love some really big name authors. I have noticed that some of the bigger names aren’t necessarily good books. There seems to be a tendency for their books to start feeling the same as their last one, even if they aren’t in a series. I want something that is original. My preferred genre is thriller/suspense/mystery and there seems to be a formula for those books. But character development and plot twists and turns still keep me reading. I realize that much of life is a pendulum. Right now my pendulum has swung toward the indie author/publisher. I throw in a mainstream mass market book from time to time though.

Ionia: Do you have any favourite categories that you do enjoy reading when you find a book that you enjoy?

Pamela: As I mentioned before I really enjoy the suspense/thriller/mystery books. But I have been branching out with genres. Historical Fiction is another favorite of mine. But I will read just about anything. I’m not a big fan of sci-fi though. Or romance. I avoid romance books most of the time. Isn’t that ironic? I write love poetry and yet I don’t like romance books. Hmmm maybe I should read more romance.

Ionia: Does price influence your buying decisions? Are you more likely to buy a less expensive book than a more expensive on or is it really about the content?

Pamela: I remember the days that I bought all of my books in hard cover…at $19.99 up to $29.99 each. So, purchasing a book that is $9.99 is still a bargain. I am not dissuaded from reading something on my Kindle by price generally. That being said, if I spend $10-$15 on a Kindle book and it isn’t well written or edited, I’m not happy. Trust me, you wouldn’t want to see how much I spend on Amazon in the course of a year. I keep thinking how nice it would be to win one of those sweepstakes where the prize is $1000 at Amazon. Wouldn’t that be fun? As much as I enjoy reading, I also enjoy finding new books and buying them for my to-be-read queue.

Ionia: Will you buy a book just because it is part of a series? The hole in the shelf syndrome, if you will? Even if you don’t intend to read the books, will you buy based on having a partial series?

Pamela: Oh dear, someone told you about me, didn’t they? I have just enough OCD tendencies that I couldn’t possibly read books in a series out of order. And if I enjoyed the first one, I most certainly will buy every single one in the series…in order. But I also purchase books from authors, even those not in a series, so I will have them all. In fact, I have every Stephen King book he has published in hard cover copies. But I also have a lot of them for my Kindle. As I said earlier, I prefer reading on my Kindle so I want them to read in that format. But my bookshelf wouldn’t be complete without every single one of his books on it.

Ionia: Does sales rank have anything to do with purchasing decisions?

Pamela: What a great question. Until I published my own book, I had no idea about the sales ranking. Obviously then, it didn’t impact my purchasing decision at all. Even now that I know about the sales ranking, I rarely pay attention to it. I think it is the thing that the authors love (at least when the numbers are good), but from a reader standpoint, not so much.

Ionia: One final question: Where do you see the most advertising for books and have you ever bought based on an ad from that place?

Pamela: The only place I really notice book advertising is on blogs and through the multitude of “free and bargain book” sites. I subscribe to several of those and I find a lot of really good books that way. I may not buy them at the time, but I add them to my wish list.

Oh my, I just realized that we’ve been talking for a long time. I know you are busy and I’m sorry if I talked too much. But thank you again for giving me the opportunity to talk about one of my favorite subjects.

Thank you so much for being here today and giving us some insight into the mind of someone who really loves literature!

Founders’ Son: A Life of Abraham Lincoln by Richard Brookhiser

Founders' Son: A Life of Abraham LincolnFounders’ Son: A Life of Abraham Lincoln by Richard Brookhiser

Abraham Lincoln grew up in the long shadow of the Founding Fathers. Seeking an intellectual and emotional replacement for his own taciturn father, Lincoln turned to the great men of the founding—Washington, Paine, Jefferson—and their great documents—the Declaration of Independence, the Constitution—for knowledge, guidance, inspiration, and purpose. Out of the power vacuum created by their passing, Lincoln emerged from among his peers as the true inheritor of the Founders’ mantle, bringing their vision to bear on the Civil War and the question of slavery.

In Founders’ Son, celebrated historian Richard Brookhiser presents a compelling new biography of Abraham Lincoln that highlights his lifelong struggle to carry on the work of the Founding Fathers. Following Lincoln from his humble origins in Kentucky to his assassination in Washington, D.C., Brookhiser shows us every side of the man: laborer, lawyer, congressman, president; storyteller, wit, lover of ribald jokes; depressive, poet, friend, visionary. And he shows that despite his many roles and his varied life, Lincoln returned time and time again to the Founders. They were rhetorical and political touchstones, the basis of his interest in politics, and the lodestars guiding him as he navigated first Illinois politics and then the national scene.

But their legacy with not sufficient. As the Civil War lengthened and the casualties mounted Lincoln wrestled with one more paternal figure—God the Father—to explain to himself, and to the nation, why ending slavery had come at such a terrible price.

Bridging the rich and tumultuous period from the founding of the United States to the Civil War, Founders’ Son is unlike any Lincoln biography to date. Penetrating in its insight, elegant in its prose, and gripping in its vivid recreation of Lincoln’s roving mind at work, this book allows us to think anew about the first hundred years of American history, and shows how we can, like Lincoln, apply the legacy of the Founding Fathers to our times.

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

“Other books on Lincoln have noted his interest in the founding fathers and how he looked back to them, but here, for the first time, a historian of the founding looks ahead to Lincoln.”

And so he did. This is a truly excellent example of careful research and a desire to look at a much analysed life in a way that it has not been considered before.

I have read tons of Lincoln books. I know people say this about books a lot, but truly, I have been collecting them since childhood and I read everything I can find on the subject. Naturally, when there have been so many books written about one man, (if you want to see an example of this, check out the Lincoln Book Tower at Ford’s,)you are sure to run into information that has been documented before, albeit not always correctly. In such cases, it becomes important to the armchair researcher how the information is presented. This book took a different approach to telling the story of Lincoln from his youngest days to the end.

It was appealing to me to see a book that did not focus on the untimely death of the sixteenth president, but rather his life. His preoccupations with certain poets, George Washington and Lincoln’s propensity to suffer from melancholy and discontent with religious beliefs were focal points of this book instead. I felt while reading this, as though the author has made a great connection with history and was a reliable source for information as well as a talented wordsmith. This book does not have the drab, dull feel of a history book as many such titles do.

**My favourite thing about this book was the way the author approached giving facts. There was no point when I thought “well that was certainly subjective to your own interpretation.” So many Lincoln books have lost me for the author’s inability to keep their own opinions out of the way of the facts. Thank you, Mr. Brookhiser for giving it to us straight.

Getting to know Lincoln through his interests and the events and people who shaped him into the famous man we have all heard about was a nice approach for this book. If you are interested in Lincoln, the founding fathers or American history in general, this would be a great addition to your library.

This review is based on a complimentary copy from the publisher. All opinions are my own.