Mirror Interview # 4 Rishika S.

Thank you so much Rishika, for joining us on Readful Things today. It is so much fun to get a glimpse into the mind of an author and learn about their process. If you would like to do your own mirror interview, please email me from my contact me page here on the blog. Thanks everyone, and please take a moment to check out her work and spread the word!

 

Tell us a little about you and your work.

My name is Rishika and I publish under the name of Rishika S. My first piece of published fiction is One Chance. It’s a short story based around the life of a married couple that is torn apart by deceit. The story follows their path to finding trust and love again. A Bond Unbroken is another love story, and is based on the reunion of two people who had been greatly in love but were forced to take different paths in life. Both of them are short stories that fall in the genre of love stories – the kind of books that you would read while travelling, on holiday, or if you wanted to read something quick.

So how do these story ideas come to you?

Most times, any one scene from the story will play itself out in my head. This generally happens through my dreams. I see these vivid dreams that come with their own back stories and that, I know, will lead somewhere. And if I remember them long enough after waking up to write down some pointers, I have a starting point around which the entire story falls into place.

You have a scene, you have an idea of a story surrounding it – then what? Do you write a haphazard first draft, just getting it all out there, or do you detail an outline? What is your writing process?

I generally just work on it in my head, forming connections and subplots until it all comes together. A lot of research goes on during this phase which often aids the process. Sometimes, I may make a brief outline. But mostly, I’ll just start writing. I write individual scenarios and bring them together and I also write from beginning to end. But I’ve never done a first draft as such. Most of my work is already quite ready to be read and structured. I guess the first draft is getting cleaned up in my head itself.

But you do follow through the outline you’ve set, whether down on paper or not?

Not necessarily. The odd thing is that you create characters, you give them personalities, and then they just start behaving the way a real person with those personalities would. The characters can turn a story differently than I’d planned – basically take a different route to get where the story needs to. Sometimes that works, sometimes it doesn’t. But I always go along with it just to see if it works better than what I’d thought of, and I’ve very often found myself agreeing with the paths they choose. That is actually the most beautiful part about writing a story. You create people, and they live out their own lives, just about following the idea you have. That’s what makes a story great, in my opinion. You have to really associate with your own characters if you want others to do so. And I want people to associate with my characters and their emotions. Only then can they associate with their situations and with the story. I want my characters to feel as alive to the readers as they do to me. I’ve found that from the many books I’ve read; the ones I’ve loved are the ones in which the characters just pull you in, all on their own. It was reading such books that made me want to write so that I could create that kind of pull in readers.

So do you think that reading is essential to being a good author?

Immensely! I think that if you don’t read, you can’t write. I read a lot as a kid, and still do. I miss reading when I need to take a break so that I can concentrate on writing. Reading is a major part of me; it’s what made me want to write. It’s what successfully pulls me out of writer’s block – just taking a break and reading for a couple of days. And there are some fantastic authors out there, who make reading not a hobby, but an experience that you live out with the characters.

If you could meet any author, past or present, who would it be and why?

J.R.R. Tolkien, because he is one author who writes beautifully and whose work, to me, is charming. His work is truly unique.

Michael Crichton, because he made me love science fiction even though I had always disliked science as a subject in school. But more importantly because his character development is brilliant – he really knows how to depict human beings and he does it so subtly that you won’t even realize it’s happening. That is why you can love, hate, and feel for his characters.

Stephen King, because from the little of his work that I’ve read (I’m really scared of reading horrors, but I’ve tried his books), and from the many quotes and interviews of his that I’ve read, I think he’s a brilliant man who voices his thoughts in a quirky, but very honest manner; and I think he’d be a great conversationalist. And I think anyone could learn a lot from him.

Let’s look at the opposite end for a moment – are there any authors, or even characters (since they’re the ones that make or break a story for you) that, given the chance, you would… I don’t know… punch in the face?

Quite a few actually. The first would be Bella, from Twilight. I’ve read the books, and I just couldn’t like her. The entire clumsy, modern damsel in constant distress needing rescuing thing didn’t work from me. Her need for a guy’s support at all times, the way she breaks down when Edward leaves, was all a bit over the top. I mean, a normal woman, I think, would pick herself up and move on. The second would be Edward Cullen – only because he sparkles like diamonds. I mean, come on! You’re a vampire! And Dracula is one of my favourite books. So I just can’t digest this new twist on the ‘why vampires can’t get out in the sun’ thing. I’m even okay with the ‘I hunt only animals’, though vampires don’t exactly have consciences, but that’s creative liberty. But shining like diamonds – nope, sorry! As someone who loved Bram Stoker’s Dracula, that’s a bit much to take. My third choice would be Frodo Baggins. Odd, I know, but not because I hated him. In fact, I thought the way his character is influenced by the ring and the way he begins to slowly change was awesome. I just feel so bad for him – he was a good guy who was entrusted with something that began to break him. And I’d punch him in the hopes of breaking him out of that spell (even though it wouldn’t work).

You clearly don’t like the Twilight saga! What about another series that has garnered just as much popularity – the Fifty Shades of Grey trilogy? You must have tried that one?

I did actually, but I couldn’t really get past the first half of the first book. It had nothing to do with the theme. BDSM has been around before Fifty Shades and will continue to be around. In fact, it’s an interesting genre to read too. But there was something about the story that just dragged on and I just couldn’t bring myself to finish it, making it only the third book I’ve ever left midway! The same goes with the Twilight saga. Vampire fiction has always been popular. I’ve read others in the genre like Katherine Sorin’s City of Lights trilogy which I really liked (the vampires were all gory and bloodthirsty in those, fitting my idea of a vampire). And there is nothing wrong with the Twilight saga or the Fifty shades trilogy. They really work for some people and, like all books, have been created through effort which I respect. But I just can’t associate with them, or really like them either.

Say you were hanging off a cliff and the only way to save yourself was to read either Twilight or Fifty Shades of Grey. Which one would it be?

I’d brace myself for the fall! No, but seriously, can I watch the Twilight movies instead? That way, I get popcorn and save a lot of time… and my life!

You like giving honest reviews. But what would you do if someone gave your work a bad review?

I’d recognize that just how I can’t like every author’s work, not every reader can like mine. But like every storyteller, there are stories that I can tell in my own way which is different from others. And those that like my way, will like my work. You cannot please everyone, that’s part of every writer’s life. Accepting that isn’t easy. But I think I’ll get there with some effort.

Do you plan on continuing with short, love stories or is something else coming up?

I’m not genre limited. I write what comes to me. So I’ve got a lot of ideas for romances, fantasy, and mysteries and thrillers, which happens to be one of my favourite genres. But right now, I’m working on a full length novel – a historical fiction based in 700 CE, India, which should be up for sale end of this year or early next year.

Last question before we wrap up – how can one know more about you?

To know more about my work and me, you can visit any of the following links to my Facebook, Goodreads, and Amazon author pages.

http://on.fb.me/R4HfLU

http://bit.ly/1ga5Hkp

http://amzn.to/1oOt1h5

Key elements to writing a stellar fiction book blurb

So…you’ve written an awesome book, right? Of course you have. You’ve slaved over it, perfected it, edited it until you can’t even see the words anymore. You have a great cover, your beta readers have sufficiently fluffed your feathers and then you realise…oh shit…(sorry Chris,) that you need to have words on this cover other than your author name and the book title.

What do you say to describe an entire book in a few sentences? How do you approach this situation when you have so many great scenes running through your head and you can’t pick just one or two?

This is going to sound silly. Wait for the logic. (Yes, I can still produce some once in a while.)

 

Treat it like a love interest.

Seriously. Think of your potential audience like someone you are trying to attract and go on a first date with.

First, you need a hook (shout.) This is the opening line that will captivate the attention of the reader and give them a reason to keep reading. Think of this ladies and gentlemen, as your pick up line.

What should this line include? A few words that give an overall feeling of the book. Is it full of danger? Steamy romance? Heartfelt family ties? You can use a complete sentence, or just a few words. Examples: “You can run, but you can’t hide.” Or “One woman. One runaway child. Two lives forever changed.”

Once you have your hook in place, next comes the body. Of course if you are going on a first date, you want the body to be attractive, right?

You don’t want the blurb to be miles long and detract from the point in the story. Keep in mind that your characters play a vital role in the book and you need to mention the important ones. It is easy to lose sight of them in the rush to make an exciting blurb, but they lead the story and need proper mention. Include the major conflict in your story, but do not give away any plot points you want the reader to discover inside the book.

Again with date mentality: Give enough to be interesting and make your potential suitor want to know more, but don’t tell the life story of your book in a single shot.

An important rule: Online dating book blurb, if you will. Before you have even met your date you can destroy any potential relationship by building up hype and not being honest. Think that little 23 year old blonde with the trim waistline and perky boobs on the computer screen is the hottest thing you’ve ever seen? How will you feel when you find out she is a 6 and a half foot tall behemoth that has a love of fried foods and a butt to back it up, also she’s 62. Do not make promises in your blurb that you can’t deliver on. People will soon find you out and word will spread. If you have written a book about snails, don’t promise it will be “the best action packed ride of the year,” unless you have somehow figured out how to make that actually work. I’ve seen stranger things.

Writing a book blurb in present tense, 3rd person will make the action seem as though it is happening right now, and make the blurb more exciting.

Finally, the closing. You have attracted your dream date, they have eyeballed you appreciatively and you have  had dinner and a nice conversation. Will they call you for a second date?

You don’t have to end on a cliffhanger in a book blurb. Sometimes this actually bothers readers, but you do want to ensure that your last sentence is a memorable one. You can end with a question, “How will Jane return to the world she knows and save the ones she loves?” Or with a statement “Mary doesn’t believe in ghosts, until she encounters one that won’t let her go.” The idea here is to sum up both conflict and plot in a single line. Not easy, but not impossible. Make certain that date has your number and intends to use it. Hinting at a resolution to the conflict you mentioned prior is a good way to close.

Another option, if you choose not to put together this type of traditional blurb, is to let the manuscript do the work for you. If you can find a particularly good excerpt from your manuscript, sometimes that will suffice as a perfect blurb. Of course, you want to ensure that you choose piece that is both exciting and has the information you want to give, but does not reveal any major plot points and isn’t terribly long.

Five important points:

Mood is important and it needs to match your book.

Length is very important as shoppers will not spend a lot of time choosing.

What makes your book stand out? Why is it different?

Editing the blurb is very important.

Read other blurbs in your genre and use the advice of your readers. What was their favourite part, why were they intrigued?

 

No one said this was easy, but it can be done. Ask yourself what would make you read a book? What kind of back cover copy interests you?

Hook that date, plan a wedding. Long term relationships offer security. Go write.

 

 

 

Hell no I don’t read, but if I did…

There will be a part 2 for this series in a day or so with the same questions asked to a lifelong reader, just for comparison.
 
I have seen a lot of blogs poll readers or feature readers and ask them what they look for in a book. What do they want to see on the cover? What do they want to see in a title? Is there something that influences their buying decision one way or the other more so than other things?
 
I’m not here to do that.
 
Well, not exactly.
 
I, being the great (short) pioneer that I am…am going to ask pretty much the same exact questions, but to someone who doesn’t read, or at least not very often, anyway. I think getting an opinion from someone who doesn’t read much is an organic approach to this non-scientific method of questioning. I’d like to know what would make someone who doesn’t usually read much, be encouraged to buy a book and maybe even pick it up and open the cover. So here we go.
 
 
My guest today does a lot of different stuff and he is a good guy, so you all can’t give him too much guff for not reading. Well, you can, but I will not be held responsible. I have to give him credit for patience. He always listens to me ramble on about books, even when he doesn’t care what I’m talking about. I do the same to him when the 49ers play. blah blah something about a funny looking little ball that has nothing to do with a foot.
 
I am going to protect his identity from the hoards of angry people who think everyone should read.
 
Rather than his actual name, we are going to call him Jeremiah “that guy.”
 
So with out further ado, here is “That guy” and I having a bookish conversation.
 

Ionia: So, “that guy,” why don’t you read all that much? I know you have to read for work and you have to read for daily life, but why don’t you read more for pleasure?

TG: I don’t find books very often that pique my interest enough to read them, or at least not all the way through. I find something that might interest me occasionally, but then I tend to lose interest rather quickly. Sometimes the plot goes to sleep and so do I.

Ionia: When you do find a book you think you’d like to read, what is it that first captures your attention? What makes you pick that book rather than another?

TG: The first thing I look at is the title. It isn’t as much the cover as it is the title. The title has to be really interesting and make me want to pick it up. If the title seems boring, I won’t even bother. Secondly, I look at the size of the book. I might be feeling ambitious, but I know my concentration has limits, so if the book is enormous…uhm…Tom Clancy…if I can watch it in the movie a lot faster there is no hope for the book. Sorry readers. I do look at the cover, but it isn’t as important to me as the blurb and the one liner that tells what others thought. I might not buy a book solely on what those say, but I’d rather read a book with a boring white cover that has people saying good things than one with an awesome cover art that has no one saying anything.

Ionia: The title thing is interesting. There have actually been studies done on what happens if a poorly selling book gets a more exciting title. The results were kind of amazing. Some books that had been out for ages started selling to the top of the charts within a few days of the change. How important are what other customers say about the book in reviews? Do you pay attention to star ratings and customer reviews?

TG: If I’m buying online I do somewhat take into account the customer reviews. A lot of it depends on whether or not it is fiction or non fiction. Fiction is subjective. People may love one writing style and not another or they may be influenced by which POV the book was set in. With non fiction, especially if you are using the book to learn a new skill or for education purposes, I would pay more attention to the reviews. If, for instance I got a book about algebra and the other customers said it was confusing and unhelpful, I may look at another one instead. But with fiction, I pay little attention to the opinions of others. Sometimes it is the one star reviews that make me interested in a book though.

Ionia: I have to agree about the one star reviews. Plus, sometimes they point out things that the four and five star reviews don’t, such as which characters could have been improved, or plot holes. I hate those. Do you do most of your reading in paper format or digital and why?

TG: I have both, but I am somewhat old fashioned. I like paper books. I don’t ever have to worry about my battery dying in the middle of a hardcover. I do have to say though, reading a paper book in the dark is not very easy. It is easier to collect more books with a reader than with normal books and it takes a lot less effort to move them.

Ionia: I’m really amazed at your bravery for facing down this rabid audience of readers and writers. I appreciate the honesty here. Don’t look behind you. Charles, put down the mallet. John, it isn’t nice to make faces. Susan…never mind. Susan you can continue whatever it is you’re doing over there. What turns you off in a book, right away? Say you have gotten past the title, and the cover, and the blurb. You’ve decided to read this book. What makes you say..never mind. Not for me.

TG: If the author can captivate me and hold my attention (for fiction anyway) within the first 3-10 pages I will continue. I can handle a small boring spot, but if it is more than a few pages I lose focus and put the book down. If I like the direction and approach the author takes to writing and I can visualise the content, I am more likely to keep reading.

Ionia: Does it matter to you if the book was put out by a big publisher or an indie author or indie press? Does the name of the publisher have any influence on if you will take the risk and buy the book?

TG: It doesn’t matter. It is more about the content than who it came from or where. If you don’t write things that I find interesting, then I won’t pick up the book.

Ionia: Do you have any favourite categories that you do enjoy reading when you find a book that you enjoy?

TG: I like to read fantasy. As I am a highly visual reader, I love the descriptions and worlds in fantasy, but I will read other stuff if it is interesting.

Ionia: Does price influence your buying decisions? Are you more likely to buy a less expensive book than a more expensive on or is it really about the content?

TG: Price really doesn’t affect my decision. If I’m liking the above named things about the book, I’ll spend the money.

Ionia: Will you buy a book just because it is part of a series? The hole in the shelf syndrome, if you will? Even if you don’t intend to read the books, will you buy based on having a partial series?

TG: No. If the book doesn’t interest me and I have books 1, 2, 3, and 5, I won’t buy 4 just because I don’t have it.

Ionia: I think our wallets all envy your reserve.  Does sales rank have anything to do with purchasing decisions?

TG: Not at all. I can find a great book at a thrift shop or one that has a million plus sales ranking. It makes no difference to me as far as buying the book.

Ionia: One final question: Where do you see the most advertising for books and have you ever bought based on an ad from that place?

TG: I see the most advertising from Kindle, but I don’t necessarily buy based on those ads. They might encourage me to look at a book, or download a sample. It really is about the content and the overall impression I get of the book. A pretty cover doesn’t mean that it will be a great fit for me.

Ionia: Thank you so much for your time and for answering all these questions. Put down your torches and pitchforks people. He is doing all of us authors a service.

 

So what do you all think about what our guest had to say today? Do you agree or disagree? Authors, here’s your chance to give your hard earned two cents.

 
 

 

The City by Dean Koontz

The CityThe City by Dean Koontz

#1 New York Times bestselling author Dean Koontz is at the peak of his acclaimed powers with this major new novel.

The city changed my life and showed me that the world is deeply mysterious. I need to tell you about her and some terrible things and wonderful things and amazing things that happened . . . and how I am still haunted by them. Including one night when I died and woke and lived again.

Here is the riveting, soul-stirring story of Jonah Kirk, son of an exceptional singer, grandson of a formidable “piano man,” a musical prodigy beginning to explore his own gifts when he crosses a group of extremely dangerous people, with shattering consequences. Set in a more innocent time not so long ago, The City encompasses a lifetime but unfolds over three extraordinary, heart-racing years of tribulation and triumph, in which Jonah first grasps the electrifying power of music and art, of enduring friendship, of everyday heroes.

The unforgettable saga of a young man coming of age within a remarkable family, and a shimmering portrait of the world that shaped him, The City is a novel that speaks to everyone, a dazzling realization of the evergreen dreams we all share. Brilliantly illumined by magic dark and light, it’s a place where enchantment and malice entwine, courage and honor are found in the most unexpected quarters, and the way forward lies buried deep inside the heart.

My rating: 3 of 5 stars

Part coming of age story, part suspense novel, this is definitely not the Dean Koontz I recall from earlier novels.

I really wasn’t sure what to think when I began reading this novel. I have had good and bad feelings about the work of this author in the past. Sometimes his work would surprise and thrill me and yet other times I would come away feeling like I just didn’t get it. This novel, was a little bit of both.

If I had to choose what I liked about this novel and sum it up in a single paragraph, it would be that it is different and a bit unexpected. The writing is superb and the descriptions did not run away with the story as I have noticed in some of his other works. This was a new direction for Mr. Koontz to take his readers, and for the most part I thought it worked.

I won’t go so far as to say that every second of this book was exciting, but it was a thoughtful tale and had a lot of fully formed, independent characters that all added to the story. There was still some suspense and some tense moments as with his other works.

Overall, I gave this book three stars for being an example of an author taking a risk and making it work. If you are a fan of the older Koontz novels, this may strike you as a bit of an oddity but I encourage you to give it a shot.

This review is based on a complimentary copy from the publisher and provided through Netgalley. All opinions are my own.

Mirror Interviews: Authors Wanted

So, I’ve been thinking about doing a Wednesday feature here on Readful again as I haven’t done one in a while. Usually the Wednesday feature is a guest blog, and I’d like to keep that tradition running…sort of.

See, there’s two things. First thing: I was talking to an author the other day who pointed out that all author interviews seem to ask the same questions over and over. Not a lot of people pay attention to them, and it gets rather monotonous answering the same boring things all the time.

second thing: I’m lazy.

So, here is my solution:

I am looking for a handful of authors who want to do a blog interview. The catch is, I’m looking for a handful of authors who want to interview–themselves. Yep. I won’t send you any boring, already answered questions. I won’t ask you boxers or briefs or who would play your lead character in the movie. Please limit your questions to however many you feel like answering:)

You interview you. Ask yourself the questions you want to answer. Tell your audience what you want them to know. I’m not going to limit this to an exact science, so if you want to have a bit of fun with it–go ahead. If you’d like to be featured, email me at the address listed on my contact page and let me know. If I get enough authors, this may become a permanent feature of the blog.

Come on authors, you know you talk to yourselves anyway.

Writer’s Intuition

Universal Signs 032

How much do you rely on intuition, gut feelings, whilst you are writing, planning and choosing the avenues you will use to market your books?

I’ve had quite a few recent conversations with authors who are trying to decide whether or not they will stick with independent publishing or if they will try their hand at traditional. One of the things I have noticed during these conversations, is that these authors tend to ignore a lot of the market trends, the information about publishing or what is currently being said about odds, and go with instinct.

So, what about you? Do you rely more on what numbers, graphs and general opinion says about your odds of success in a venture, or do you listen to the inner voice and trust your feelings?

Do you ever stay away from something just because you have a bad feeling about it?

 

collecting thoughts

Hello everyone:)

I’m working on a new project right now, and I was hoping you could all give me some input on a question I have been mulling over. When you read a book what do you want in a villain?

Do you want someone who is senselessly and inherently evil, or one that can be almost likable? Does your bad guy need a defined reason to do the things he does or can he just like being bad?

Can you form a connection and hate him or love to hate him if he has virtually no good qualities to redeem him?

I have been tossing around ideas and am really curious to see what you think.

Happy Birthday Helena!

If you are not familiar with Helena helenahannbasquiat.wordpress.com

You should take a moment to visit her site and see all of the fantastic material there. Helena is one of the most engaging and witty people that I have had the pleasure of running across on WordPress. She is also an author, so if you visit her site, be sure to check out what she has written. Or you can check it out here:

http://www.amazon.com/Memoirs-Dilettante-One-Helena-Hann-Basquiat-ebook/dp/B00J6B3GB4/ref=tmm_kin_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&sr=8-1&qid=1397322389

 

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But this post, is about something else. Today just happens to be Helena’s

 

                                                                            Birthday!

If you find a moment, go tell her happy birthday today. In the mean time, enjoy these videos.

Doctor Sleep by Stephen King

Doctor Sleep (The Shining, #2)Doctor Sleep by Stephen King

Stephen King returns to the characters and territory of one of his most popular novels ever, The Shining, in this instantly riveting novel about the now middle-aged Dan Torrance (the boy protagonist of The Shining) and the very special twelve-year-old girl he must save from a tribe of murderous paranormals.

On highways across America, a tribe of people called The True Knot travel in search of sustenance. They look harmless—mostly old, lots of polyester, and married to their RVs. But as Dan Torrance knows, and spunky twelve-year-old Abra Stone learns, The True Knot are quasi-immortal, living off the “steam” that children with the “shining” produce when they are slowly tortured to death.

Haunted by the inhabitants of the Overlook Hotel where he spent one horrific childhood year, Dan has been drifting for decades, desperate to shed his father’s legacy of despair, alcoholism, and violence. Finally, he settles in a New Hampshire town, an AA community that sustains him, and a job at a nursing home where his remnant “shining” power provides the crucial final comfort to the dying. Aided by a prescient cat, he becomes “Doctor Sleep.”

Then Dan meets the evanescent Abra Stone, and it is her spectacular gift, the brightest shining ever seen, that reignites Dan’s own demons and summons him to a battle for Abra’s soul and survival. This is an epic war between good and evil, a gory, glorious story that will thrill the millions of devoted readers of The Shining and satisfy anyone new to the territory of this icon in the King canon.

My rating: 3 of 5 stars

I think many of us went into reading Doctor Sleep with some form of trepidation. When the central focus of the original book is a hotel–and that hotel is nonexistent at the end of the book, how does one pick up where they left off and write a second book based on that original?

Well…apparently what you do in this case is build a new story off of scant memories and fill in the rest with very imaginative and yet ultimately pretty pointless paranormal characters.

Did I love this book? No!

Why?

For so many reasons. Here are a few:

The Shining scared the Hell clean out of me. I’m not going to get into the Kubrick Vs. King debate here as far as the movies go and the possible hidden meanings (think Room 237,) but I will say that the thing I loved about the original book, was that there was a fine balance of psychological terror and paranormal terror. I didn’t get that from Doctor Sleep. Really, the only time I felt like the book bordered on any kind of reality I could accept was when Dan was remembering the events of the Overlook and his childhood.

Rose the Hat. My, oh my. One of my pet peeves is when an author spends an entire book building up an evil character and then they die a pointless, silly death that never showcases all of the talents they have for being bad. I won’t include a spoiler here to say how or exactly why I feel as I do, but I definitely thought this was a case of “ran out of good ideas,” when it came to the end of her story.

Abra was a spoiled, self-appreciative brat. I want to love the main characters in the books I read, I think we all do. I loved Dan, but I suppose much of that probably came from the already established feelings I had for him. (He was such a little slugger in the first book.) Abra did not impress me much. She was supposed to be such a powerful kid, and yet most of the time she was featured hugging a cuddly toy and taking the advice of others. Had this been a movie, it would have been a situation where the audience members kept saying, “how dumb is this kid?” for getting herself into the situations she did.

I could go on, but I want this review to be balanced, so I will move on to the things I liked.

If I wasn’t looking at this as “The Shining part Two,” I might have felt differently about it. Still, it was an interesting book with a lot of very captivating ideas. I liked that Dan still had some psychic abilities even after he got older and that he was putting them to use in a helpful way.

Azreel the cat was a nice addition to this story and worked well with Dan’s talents.

Whilst I expected there to be more reference to the events in the original story, and was somewhat dismayed that there wasn’t, I appreciated that the grounds where the Overlook stood were used as an important part of this book. I never would have guessed how they were going to be reinvented, and I liked how Rose could sense the evil that lie there, beneath the surface.

The relationships Dan built throughout the course of Doctor Sleep reminded me that he was human and gave me a sense of nostalgia, particularly at the end, when he sees a certain specter.

Typical of Stephen King works, there is a healthy amount of telepathic ability between the characters. Although I found the paranormal aspects of this book more over the top than in the original novel, I also felt the “King vibe” that has been absent in some of the more recent works. His sense of humour and use of irony was ever-present in this book, and that was nice to see.

My overall opinion of Doctor sleep is this: If you are a big fan of Mr. King and in particular of the Shining, you will want to read this to satisfy your curiosity about what happened after the Overlook. You may love it or hate it or, like me, find yourself somewhere in between, but either way you should check it out.

As a standalone novel this might have earned a higher rating from me, but as a book in any way connected to one of the finest horror works in history (my opinion of course,) this did not in any way compare. The feeling of claustrophobic, psychological terror that made the Shining so frightening was absent in this book.

While there may have been 237 reasons to love this book, there were at least 217 reasons not to. It wasn’t the worst book ever, nor the best. 3 stars is my final opinion.

Legends of Windemere: Family of the Tri-Rune Cover Reveal

Cover Art by Jason Pedersen

Cover Art by Jason Pedersen

Legends of Windemere: Family of the Tri-Rune is set to debut on Sunday, March 16th!!!

The magical adventure continues after Luke Callindor and his friends recover from their battles in Haven.

Nyx still has nightmares about casting the genocide spell in Hero’s Gate. Every night her heart is gripped by the sensation of hundreds of goblins dying by her magic. By the request of Lord Highrider and Duke Solomon, she is returning to fix the damage she caused. With Luke Callindor and Sari by her side, Nyx is ready to face the vengeful goblins and opportunistic thieves that plague Hero’s Gate. Yet, there is a darker threat that was born from her violated magic: The Krypters.

It is another action-packed, character driven story that will reveal one of our heroes has been lied to for their entire life.

About the Author:

Charles author photo B&WCharles Yallowitz was born and raised on Long Island, NY, but he has spent most of his life wandering his own imagination in a blissful haze. Occasionally, he would return from this world for the necessities such as food, showers, and Saturday morning cartoons. One day he returned from his imagination and decided he would share his stories with the world. After his wife decided that she was tired of hearing the same stories repeatedly, she convinced him that it would make more sense to follow his dream of being a fantasy author. So, locked within the house under orders to shut up and get to work, Charles brings you Legends of Windemere. He looks forward to sharing all of his stories with you and his wife is happy he finally has someone else to play with.

Blog: Legends of Windemere
Twitter: @cyallowitz
Facebook: Charles Yallowitz

We’re still taking volunteers for the April blog tour. So fill out the form HERE!

Read the Previous Volumes of Legends of Windemere!!!

Cover Art by Jason Pedersen

Cover Art by Jason Pedersen

Cover Art by Jason Pedersen

Cover Art by Jason Pedersen

Cover by Jason Pedersen

Cover by Jason Pedersen